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FSD3061 Maternity Care in Rural China 2008 - 2009

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Authors

  • Hemminki, Elina (National Institute for Health and Welfare)
  • Klemetti, Reija (National Institute for Health and Welfare)
  • Long, Qian (Duke Kunshan University. Global Health Research Center)

Keywords

birth weight, childbirth, countryside, delivery (pregnancy), maternity services, midwives, mothers, pregnancy

Abstract

This study examined the effects of three maternity service practices in the countryside of China. These practices were (1) covering some of the costs of maternity, (2) added training to midwives in terms of clinical competence, and (3) added healthcare training to midwives and village doctors. The study was funded by the European Commission (CHIMACA 015396).

The questions covered the costs of pregnancy and maternity and the financial support/benefits received, previous pregnancies and the number of children, duration of the pregnancy and working during pregnancy. It was also asked if the respondents had visited a doctor or a midwife due to the pregnancy, and, if they had visited a city hospital, who had directed them to the hospital. Further questions examined what sort of matters were discussed during these visits and whether the respondent had used a maternity card.

The mothers were asked where their child(ren) had been delivered and if someone helped with the delivery. Home birthers were asked why they had given birth at home. Further questions examined the delivery procedure (c-section/vaginal birth/assisted). The respondents were also asked how long they had spent in the hospital before and after birth. Finally, the respondents were asked how and where post-natal maternity care was handled and what sort of matters were discussed.

Background variables included the age of the child's parents, education level, occupation and region.

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